It is currently Tue Jul 07, 2020 12:42 pm

All times are UTC


Forum rules


Please read the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 6:16 pm
Posts: 3479
Location: Belgium
Unless I missed it they must be the only team not having confirmed any driver of their 2014 line-up. They asid they wanted 1 experienced driver at least. Kobayashi seems an obvious and of course Heikki. Di Resta I think had it with F1. Petrov I don't think he would go back to a team that dropped him after 1 year while he made sure they finished ahead of Marussia in 2012 also giving them their best finish ever. Heikki wouldn't excite me, so yeah give me Koba any day even though I would prefer him to have a better car.
Second driver, a worthy rookie I hope as neither VDG or Pic seem anything special to me.

_________________
F1 fan since 1989
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:11 pm
Posts: 742
Paul Di Resta has to be a better choice than Heikki (and Koba, unless he has sponsership...)

_________________
Schumacher was better than Senna.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 6:26 pm
Posts: 91
It will be Kamui Kobayashi and Marcus Ericsson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:55 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 6:16 pm
Posts: 3479
Location: Belgium
Ross089 wrote:
It will be Kamui Kobayashi and Marcus Ericsson


Do you have a source for that Ericsson guy?

_________________
F1 fan since 1989
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 11:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:53 am
Posts: 3226
Location: Somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert
To me di Resta seems quicker than Kovi. But talk of di Resta having a bad attitude and being unliked within FI is too ubiquitous for there to be no truth to it. If I were Fernandes and I'd watched di Resta behave as he has iin a midfield team I'd be very worried how he'd be in a back of the grid one. Kovi meanwhile is a known quantity, familiar with the team and very popular. In a small team things like that matter a lot, and even if di Resta did bring an extra tenth or two, what difference would it really make to Caterham? Less that it would to any other team bar Marussia.

_________________
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?

-Epicurus


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 11:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 1:38 pm
Posts: 2567
Ross089 wrote:
It will be Kamui Kobayashi and Marcus Ericsson


Yep. Said it a while ago.. Just wait and see. ;)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 1:25 pm 
I had such high hopes for Caterham a few years back when Tony Fernandes bought the team. His move to Renault engines was smart-- but his driver selection seems poor.

Didn't Minardi, despite backmarker status, have great success picking top notch drivers? Didn't Alonso start with Minardi?

Maybe the simple answer is that F1 has gotten even more expensive than in the Minardi era, and pay drivers are de rigeur for backmarker teams. Seems so sad. Seems broken. :(


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 1:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 4:14 pm
Posts: 2033
Location: South Yorkshire
Must be one of the few who couldn't care who they hire as drivers, they should probably take a leaf from Marussia and keep at least one if their current drivers, preferably Giedo as he showed a definite improvement over the season unlike Pic who was completely average all season long.

_________________
Team Vettel, Ricciardo, Bottas and Button.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 2:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:53 am
Posts: 3226
Location: Somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert
silkjet wrote:
I had such high hopes for Caterham a few years back when Tony Fernandes bought the team. His move to Renault engines was smart-- but his driver selection seems poor.

Didn't Minardi, despite backmarker status, have great success picking top notch drivers? Didn't Alonso start with Minardi?

Maybe the simple answer is that F1 has gotten even more expensive than in the Minardi era, and pay drivers are de rigeur for backmarker teams. Seems so sad. Seems broken. :(

I think that's basically it. Supposedly Briatore chucked a few bucks Minardi's way to ensure both Alonso and Webber got a shot, but you're talking about peanuts by today's standards.

The sport is more expensive but also, thanks to the ever heightened perception of F1 as an effective marketing tool, there seem to be a lot more 'second tier' talents with serious backing. Look at people like Petrov, Sirotkin, Karthikeyan, Maldonado, Perez et al. They're arguably not top drawer but through virtue of their nationality alone they bring massive sponsorship, essentially because their home country views F1 as a good means of promoting itself. There have always been drivers like Chilton who have moneyed connections, or a di Resta or Kobayashi who got a seat partly thanks to manufacturer loyalty but then had to retain it on their own. They're not what's damaging the sport IMO, they've always been part of it and the money they bring isn't significant enough to skew things too much. It's the effectively state sponsored Maldonado types that are the problem, those who bring enough money to buy decent seats and make a midfield team reliant on them.

_________________
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?

-Epicurus


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 3:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 9:20 am
Posts: 2706
Location: Herts, UK
I'll be pretty disappointed if Caterham really are stupid enough to once again go with a complete new lineup. Did they not learn last year? Heikki was brought in for a reason. Keep 1 of your 2 drivers in the car, even if its only for the first half of the season.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 4:18 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 3:56 am
Posts: 8767
Location: London
Caterham need one of the drivers they had from last year. They need to compare how the cars feels compared to last, even with the new rules. They need that consistency. What they don't need is a rookie who is learning the ropes when the cars are supposed to be very difficult to handle, not if they are on such a tight budget.

As much as I don't rate Kobayshi, he does at least have some experience. He isn't going to do much in a Caterham that doesn't have much money to develop though. He'd be better off sticking with Ferrari in sportscars.

_________________
1994 1995 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Get well soon Schumi.

No one call anyone a moo-pickle...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 4:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
Balibari wrote:
To me di Resta seems quicker than Kovi. But talk of di Resta having a bad attitude and being unliked within FI is too ubiquitous for there to be no truth to it. If I were Fernandes and I'd watched di Resta behave as he has iin a midfield team I'd be very worried how he'd be in a back of the grid one. Kovi meanwhile is a known quantity, familiar with the team and very popular. In a small team things like that matter a lot, and even if di Resta did bring an extra tenth or two, what difference would it really make to Caterham? Less that it would to any other team bar Marussia.


Where is this?

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2007 10:22 pm
Posts: 878
Balibari wrote:
To me di Resta seems quicker than Kovi. But talk of di Resta having a bad attitude and being unliked within FI is too ubiquitous for there to be no truth to it. If I were Fernandes and I'd watched di Resta behave as he has iin a midfield team I'd be very worried how he'd be in a back of the grid one. Kovi meanwhile is a known quantity, familiar with the team and very popular. In a small team things like that matter a lot, and even if di Resta did bring an extra tenth or two, what difference would it really make to Caterham? Less that it would to any other team bar Marussia.



You might well be right about the difference it might make to a backmarker team. But to paraphrase Patrick Head when describing Nigel Mansell: "He could be an obnoxious sugarplum, but he was a quick obnoxious sugarplum, and I'd rather have that any day, than a slow nice guy".

Speed counts. And, if DiResta is faster than Kovalainen, that could be the difference that gets and keeps Caterham ahead of Marussia. At the end of the season, that could be worth millions.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 6:54 pm
Posts: 1530
Lotus49 wrote:
Balibari wrote:
To me di Resta seems quicker than Kovi. But talk of di Resta having a bad attitude and being unliked within FI is too ubiquitous for there to be no truth to it. If I were Fernandes and I'd watched di Resta behave as he has iin a midfield team I'd be very worried how he'd be in a back of the grid one. Kovi meanwhile is a known quantity, familiar with the team and very popular. In a small team things like that matter a lot, and even if di Resta did bring an extra tenth or two, what difference would it really make to Caterham? Less that it would to any other team bar Marussia.


Where is this?


Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 12:05 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
wire2004 wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
Balibari wrote:
To me di Resta seems quicker than Kovi. But talk of di Resta having a bad attitude and being unliked within FI is too ubiquitous for there to be no truth to it. If I were Fernandes and I'd watched di Resta behave as he has iin a midfield team I'd be very worried how he'd be in a back of the grid one. Kovi meanwhile is a known quantity, familiar with the team and very popular. In a small team things like that matter a lot, and even if di Resta did bring an extra tenth or two, what difference would it really make to Caterham? Less that it would to any other team bar Marussia.


Where is this?


Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 7:07 am
Posts: 11443
Balibari wrote:
silkjet wrote:
I had such high hopes for Caterham a few years back when Tony Fernandes bought the team. His move to Renault engines was smart-- but his driver selection seems poor.

Didn't Minardi, despite backmarker status, have great success picking top notch drivers? Didn't Alonso start with Minardi?

Maybe the simple answer is that F1 has gotten even more expensive than in the Minardi era, and pay drivers are de rigeur for backmarker teams. Seems so sad. Seems broken. :(

I think that's basically it. Supposedly Briatore chucked a few bucks Minardi's way to ensure both Alonso and Webber got a shot, but you're talking about peanuts by today's standards.


Didn't Alonso bring a whole lot of money with him? Isn't that basically why his detractors to this day still call him a pay driver? Or did that have to do with the Ferrari-Raikkonen situation?

In the end I think this goes up and down, possibly together with the economic climate. There were other times in history where teams had a really hard time and not very talented drivers could just buy a seat, then there were times where we had so many teams there had to be prequalifying sessions.

_________________
Go Vandoorne :( - Verstappen - Vettel!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:07 pm
Posts: 10057
mds wrote:
Balibari wrote:
silkjet wrote:
I had such high hopes for Caterham a few years back when Tony Fernandes bought the team. His move to Renault engines was smart-- but his driver selection seems poor.

Didn't Minardi, despite backmarker status, have great success picking top notch drivers? Didn't Alonso start with Minardi?

Maybe the simple answer is that F1 has gotten even more expensive than in the Minardi era, and pay drivers are de rigeur for backmarker teams. Seems so sad. Seems broken. :(

I think that's basically it. Supposedly Briatore chucked a few bucks Minardi's way to ensure both Alonso and Webber got a shot, but you're talking about peanuts by today's standards.


Didn't Alonso bring a whole lot of money with him? Isn't that basically why his detractors to this day still call him a pay driver? Or did that have to do with the Ferrari-Raikkonen situation?

In the end I think this goes up and down, possibly together with the economic climate. There were other times in history where teams had a really hard time and not very talented drivers could just buy a seat, then there were times where we had so many teams there had to be prequalifying sessions.

I think those talks are caused by his Santander sponsorship.
Quote:
However, it seems Petrov is finally tired of being called a paying driver, saying if he is than so too is Ferrari's Alonso.

He told Italian daily La Stampa: "I do not think there is a difference between me and Alonso.

"Everyone knows that he is funded by money from the Banco di Santander

http://www.planet-f1.com/driver/3213/75 ... ing-driver

_________________
Räikkönen - Vettel - Bottas
Thank you Nico - You´re the champ!

PF1 Pick 10 Competition 2016: CHAMPION (2 wins, 8 podiums)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 2:04 pm
Posts: 2356
But wasnt that later when he was already winning? Alonso wasnt sponsored by Santander in his early career steps, was he?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 1:02 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 10, 2011 11:47 pm
Posts: 1150
Not sure how reliable this info is but this site thinks Koba has been signed.

http://www.f1today.net/en/news/caterham-sign-kobayashi?

_________________
Champions are made from something they have deep inside of them - a desire, a dream, a vision. They have last-minute stamina, they have to be a little faster, they have the skill & the will but the will must be stronger than the skill. Muhammad Ali


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 2:29 am 
Online

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 34277
Paolo_Lasardi wrote:
But wasnt that later when he was already winning? Alonso wasnt sponsored by Santander in his early career steps, was he?

Yep i'm sure they didn't sponsor his two WDC winning campaigns?

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 5:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:58 pm
Posts: 142
Location: Ballarat VIC AU
From James Allen on Twitter:

Quote:
@CaterhamF1 revealing drivers next week. Sounds like @kamui_kobayashi will be one, possibly Marcus Ericsson or @AlguersuariJA the other?


Hadn't heard Jaime mentioned previously, but if he were to join with Kobayashi I'd be pretty happy with that lineup. Although I'd also like to see Ericsson given a run. Perhaps if they employed all 3 drivers and had Marcus run Friday mornings (like Williams did with Bottas)?

_________________
Williams Martini Racing

Supporter of Valtteri Bottas & Felipe Massa - Williams Martini Racing
Also Daniel Ricciardo [Red Bull Racing] & Mark Webber [Porsche WEC Team LMP1]


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 17012
Kobayashi/Alguersuari would be a very good line up.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 17012
silkjet wrote:
I had such high hopes for Caterham a few years back when Tony Fernandes bought the team. His move to Renault engines was smart-- but his driver selection seems poor.

Didn't Minardi, despite backmarker status, have great success picking top notch drivers? Didn't Alonso start with Minardi?

Maybe the simple answer is that F1 has gotten even more expensive than in the Minardi era, and pay drivers are de rigeur for backmarker teams. Seems so sad. Seems broken. :(



I think you are looking back with rose tinted specs a bit. The good drivers that went through Minardi were there because Briatore put them there. Here is a list of Minardi line ups starting from most recent...

Albers/Friesacher/Doornbos
Baumgartner/Bruni
Verstappen/Wilson
Webber/Yoong
Alonso/Marques/Yoong
Gene/Mazzacane
Gene/Badoer
Nakano/Tuero
Katayama/Trulli/Marques
Lamy/Fissichella/Marques/Lavaggi
Badoer/Martini/Lamy

I believe all of those except perhaps Martini came in with at least a little financial backing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 10:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 1:40 pm
Posts: 6650
Lotus49 wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.


It is just a foolish thing to do, to go out publicly criticizing your team/company. You better be someone in a strong position to do that, so then you may go away with just not being liked by the side of those who you criticize. There is a harsh climate in F1 for the drivers, so difficult to get the seat and so easy to lose it. Don't go riding your high horses by this mean of "pulling the team up for mistakes they made"; it won't help neither you nor the team.

"His image among F1 insiders is not positive, a result of some of his critical outbursts against his team on the radio, and other stories about his attitude that have done the rounds."

"Friends tell of a jovial, amusing character who is fun to be around in private. But Di Resta has chosen not to show that side of himself to the world, a decision that must now be viewed as a mistake."


- Andrew Benson

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/25346242


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:28 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.


It is just a foolish thing to do, to go out publicly criticizing your team/company. You better be someone in a strong position to do that, so then you may go away with just not being liked by the side of those who you criticize. There is a harsh climate in F1 for the drivers, so difficult to get the seat and so easy to lose it. Don't go riding your high horses by this mean of "pulling the team up for mistakes they made"; it won't help neither you nor the team.

"His image among F1 insiders is not positive, a result of some of his critical outbursts against his team on the radio, and other stories about his attitude that have done the rounds."

"Friends tell of a jovial, amusing character who is fun to be around in private. But Di Resta has chosen not to show that side of himself to the world, a decision that must now be viewed as a mistake."


- Andrew Benson

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/25346242



But you can get on your high horse if you have money?. At least when he was critical it was warranted. Nothing wrong with that. I agree it's a harsh climate for the drivers but you should't have to walk around biting your tongue just because you don't bring money.

The reason he doesn't have a drive is he doesn't bring money and he hasn't shown enough for teams to take the financial hit to sign him. Not because of his attitude.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 10:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 1:40 pm
Posts: 6650
Lotus49 wrote:
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.


It is just a foolish thing to do, to go out publicly criticizing your team/company. You better be someone in a strong position to do that, so then you may go away with just not being liked by the side of those who you criticize. There is a harsh climate in F1 for the drivers, so difficult to get the seat and so easy to lose it. Don't go riding your high horses by this mean of "pulling the team up for mistakes they made"; it won't help neither you nor the team.

"His image among F1 insiders is not positive, a result of some of his critical outbursts against his team on the radio, and other stories about his attitude that have done the rounds."

"Friends tell of a jovial, amusing character who is fun to be around in private. But Di Resta has chosen not to show that side of himself to the world, a decision that must now be viewed as a mistake."


- Andrew Benson

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/25346242



But you can get on your high horse if you have money?. At least when he was critical it was warranted. Nothing wrong with that. I agree it's a harsh climate for the drivers but you should't have to walk around biting your tongue just because you don't bring money.

The reason he doesn't have a drive is he doesn't bring money and he hasn't shown enough for teams to take the financial hit to sign him. Not because of his attitude.


You asked were that PdR's attitude was, and you got some replies. Which you yourself summarized as "pulling the team up for mistakes" (in public). No disagreement there. Now, wether you may think that such an attitude is fine and that there is nothing wrong with it, it's another thing. Apparently, other people have different perceptions than you.

But I agree that the reasons for him to lose the seat in F1 are elsewhere: neither he had enough of a sponsorship money to buy one, nor he apparently has shown enough to command one. What I meant was that the only result you may count on by going out to publicly criticize/blame your company/team for their mistakes is to antagonize them. So it won't really help you in the already tough situation. You won't get anybody's appreciations, and particularly so if it is not in your job description to go pulling them for their mistakes. As if the team was so incompetent that they needed to learn from PdR via some media outlet what mistakes they did, otherwise they would remain in a blissful ignorance for ever.

One may succeed to come across in public with a message "I am doing fine but my company/team is not" but yes, better you bite your tongue: either you control your tongue or your tongue will control you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.


It is just a foolish thing to do, to go out publicly criticizing your team/company. You better be someone in a strong position to do that, so then you may go away with just not being liked by the side of those who you criticize. There is a harsh climate in F1 for the drivers, so difficult to get the seat and so easy to lose it. Don't go riding your high horses by this mean of "pulling the team up for mistakes they made"; it won't help neither you nor the team.

"His image among F1 insiders is not positive, a result of some of his critical outbursts against his team on the radio, and other stories about his attitude that have done the rounds."

"Friends tell of a jovial, amusing character who is fun to be around in private. But Di Resta has chosen not to show that side of himself to the world, a decision that must now be viewed as a mistake."


- Andrew Benson

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/25346242



But you can get on your high horse if you have money?. At least when he was critical it was warranted. Nothing wrong with that. I agree it's a harsh climate for the drivers but you should't have to walk around biting your tongue just because you don't bring money.

The reason he doesn't have a drive is he doesn't bring money and he hasn't shown enough for teams to take the financial hit to sign him. Not because of his attitude.


You asked were that PdR's attitude was, and you got some replies. Which you yourself summarized as "pulling the team up for mistakes" (in public). No disagreement there.

Now, wether you may think that such an attitude is fine and that there is nothing wrong with it, it's another thing. Apparently, other people have different perceptions than you.



One may succeed to come across in public with a message "I am doing fine but my company/team is not" but yes, better you bite your tongue: either you control your tongue or your tongue will control you.


I asked balibari where was the ubiquitous talk of Di Restas bad attitude and being unliked within FI. Wire answered criticising the team post qualifying and I asked him if it's justified, does it matter.


You have the perception that it matters and he, and i assume all drivers, should bite their tongue, which is fine. If it's all the same too you I'll wait for Balibari and Wire to answer the conversation i was having with them for themselves.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 1:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 1:40 pm
Posts: 6650
Lotus49 wrote:
I asked balibari where was the ubiquitous talk of Di Restas bad attitude and being unliked within FI. Wire answered criticising the team post qualifying and I asked him if it's justified, does it matter.

You have the perception that it matters and he, and i assume all drivers, should bite their tongue, which is fine. If it's all the same too you I'll wait for Balibari and Wire to answer the conversation i was having with them for themselves.


And I responded with my opinion on the subject (it is a public forum). Yes, it is the matter of perceptions. As you have yours, other people have theirs. As I posted that one of Andrew B, "His image among F1 insiders is not positive", there is from another source:

There have been rumblings about the 27-year-old’s discontent in the middle of the grid and at the Silverstone based team, amid his recent criticism of race strategies and even reports that a scuffle broke out in the team pit garage at Montreal.

http://grandprix247.com/2013/06/26/di-r ... -contract/

Wether "unliked" of "not positive" of "discontent", these impressions of PdR's attitude are there.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 2:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
I asked balibari where was the ubiquitous talk of Di Restas bad attitude and being unliked within FI. Wire answered criticising the team post qualifying and I asked him if it's justified, does it matter.

You have the perception that it matters and he, and i assume all drivers, should bite their tongue, which is fine. If it's all the same too you I'll wait for Balibari and Wire to answer the conversation i was having with them for themselves.


And I responded with my opinion on the subject (it is a public forum). Yes, it is the matter of perceptions. As you have yours, other people have theirs.


Wether "unliked" of "not positive" of "discontent", these impressions of PdR's attitude are there.



Which is fine(like I said).


To which i asked if the driver is right does speaking out matter. You've given your opinion, which,again,is perfectly fine. Agree to disagree. I would still like to know their opinion if that's okay.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:06 pm 
Online

Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:30 pm
Posts: 34277
Lotus49 wrote:
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.


It is just a foolish thing to do, to go out publicly criticizing your team/company. You better be someone in a strong position to do that, so then you may go away with just not being liked by the side of those who you criticize. There is a harsh climate in F1 for the drivers, so difficult to get the seat and so easy to lose it. Don't go riding your high horses by this mean of "pulling the team up for mistakes they made"; it won't help neither you nor the team.

"His image among F1 insiders is not positive, a result of some of his critical outbursts against his team on the radio, and other stories about his attitude that have done the rounds."

"Friends tell of a jovial, amusing character who is fun to be around in private. But Di Resta has chosen not to show that side of himself to the world, a decision that must now be viewed as a mistake."


- Andrew Benson

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/25346242



But you can get on your high horse if you have money?. At least when he was critical it was warranted. Nothing wrong with that. I agree it's a harsh climate for the drivers but you should't have to walk around biting your tongue just because you don't bring money.

The reason he doesn't have a drive is he doesn't bring money and he hasn't shown enough for teams to take the financial hit to sign him. Not because of his attitude.

Well he seemed to have an annoying habit of criticising the team when things went wrong then bigging himself up when things went good

_________________
PF1 Pick 10 Competition

2013: 5th Place
2014: Champion
2015: 3rd Place
2016: 4th Place

2017: 9th Place
2018: 7th place

Wins: Canada 2018, Abu Dhabi 2017
Podiums: (8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
pokerman wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
wire2004 wrote:
Where is do restas attitude.
The public slating of the team post qualifiying. Not toeing the line team wise.


You mean pulling the team up for mistakes they made like they did with him last year and this.

Since when is it ok for teams to ask for or expect more from their drivers but the reverse is frowned upon.


Surely what matters is, was it justified?, Either way.


I can't recall an instance where Di Resta layed into his team when it was his own fault and I certainly haven't seen or read of an ubiquitous feeling around the paddock of a dislike towards Di Resta from Force India.


It is just a foolish thing to do, to go out publicly criticizing your team/company. You better be someone in a strong position to do that, so then you may go away with just not being liked by the side of those who you criticize. There is a harsh climate in F1 for the drivers, so difficult to get the seat and so easy to lose it. Don't go riding your high horses by this mean of "pulling the team up for mistakes they made"; it won't help neither you nor the team.

"His image among F1 insiders is not positive, a result of some of his critical outbursts against his team on the radio, and other stories about his attitude that have done the rounds."

"Friends tell of a jovial, amusing character who is fun to be around in private. But Di Resta has chosen not to show that side of himself to the world, a decision that must now be viewed as a mistake."


- Andrew Benson

http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/formula1/25346242



But you can get on your high horse if you have money?. At least when he was critical it was warranted. Nothing wrong with that. I agree it's a harsh climate for the drivers but you should't have to walk around biting your tongue just because you don't bring money.

The reason he doesn't have a drive is he doesn't bring money and he hasn't shown enough for teams to take the financial hit to sign him. Not because of his attitude.

Well he seemed to have an annoying habit of criticising the team when things went wrong then bigging himself up when things went good


But if in those cases that's what happened I don't see how that's annoying.

I would find it annoying if he was criticising the team for crashing out or any of his errors while praising himself for strategic decisions or things that had nothing to do with him.

But, each to their own. I sense I must be in the minority on this one.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 5:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 6:51 pm
Posts: 68
And I thought this thread was about Caterham drivers not PDR's attitude lol


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 6:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 18, 2010 8:28 am
Posts: 499
Lotus49 wrote:
I asked balibari where was the ubiquitous talk of Di Restas bad attitude and being unliked within FI. Wire answered criticising the team post qualifying and I asked him if it's justified, does it matter.

Of course it matters, even if/when it is justified.
There are only 22 F1 drivers in the whole world. If you're criticising the team that decide whether you remain as one of those 22, then of course it matters.
Do you criticise the guy that decides whether you get fired or not? No. That's just common sense.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 7:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
Lentulus wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
I asked balibari where was the ubiquitous talk of Di Restas bad attitude and being unliked within FI. Wire answered criticising the team post qualifying and I asked him if it's justified, does it matter.

Of course it matters, even if/when it is justified.
There are only 22 F1 drivers in the whole world. If you're criticising the team that decide whether you remain as one of those 22, then of course it matters.
Do you criticise the guy that decides whether you get fired or not? No. That's just common sense.


If they were at fault for whatever I was speaking out about then yes, absolutely.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 7:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2011 8:39 am
Posts: 800
As much I like to support the British drivers there is no denying that Di Resta's attitude sucked at times, shame because I think he is a decent driver. If I ran Caterham I'd hire Robin Frijns as I think the guy is special, if Air-Asia are trying to break into the Japanese domestic flight market then Kobayashi is not a bad choice. Caterham have nothing to lose with the drivers I've suggested and next week most of the teams are launching their new cars, I can't wait to see them! Winter F1 starts next week!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 8:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:13 pm
Posts: 17012
Lotus49 wrote:

But, each to their own. I sense I must be in the minority on this one.


As a fan I enjoy and want drivers to speak out and say how they feel however I also know that if I was critical of my employer and colleagues to the press I would probably find myself without a job pretty quickly. I guess your view depends on if you think drivers are employees of the team or there own business contracting themselves out. Although even if its the latter its still best to not bite the hand that feeds you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 8:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 1:40 pm
Posts: 6650
Lotus49 wrote:
Lentulus wrote:
Do you criticise the guy that decides whether you get fired or not? No. That's just common sense.


If they were at fault for whatever I was speaking out about then yes, absolutely.


Yeah, and if any possible let it be done in public, preferably through FB or Tweeter or some journalist. :twisted:

-------------------

Flying Scotsman’s lack of ready-made sponsors and terse interviews counted against him

To a certain degree, the rather reticent and terse Di Resta lost out when it came down to up-front presentations of a personality that resounded with dour outpourings from a rarely-smiling face in televised paddock interviews.

And his sometimes brusque criticisms of his team both behind the scenes and over the car-to-pits radio when errors not of his own making have occurred will not have boosted his popularity.

Force India’s deputy boss Bob Fernley claimed that the team members and backroom boys were not troubled by those issues, though I doubt it, and he added: “In today’s world you’ve got to have two sides...in and out of the team. In the corporate world, I don’t think it would go down well and could limit opportunities.”

http://gulfnews.com/sport/motorsport/pa ... -1.1268254


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 8:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:21 pm
Posts: 1821
paulsf1fix wrote:
As much I like to support the British drivers there is no denying that Di Resta's attitude sucked at times, shame because I think he is a decent driver. If I ran Caterham I'd hire Robin Frijns as I think the guy is special, if Air-Asia are trying to break into the Japanese domestic flight market then Kobayashi is not a bad choice. Caterham have nothing to lose with the drivers I've suggested and next week most of the teams are launching their new cars, I can't wait to see them! Winter F1 starts next week!!!


If Kobayashi is coming with the millions he collected at the end of 2012 I don't think he's a bad choice full stop! He's on the pace and consistent, that's what a backmarker team needs. Obviously they'll only take people with money, so if Kobayashi has some there aren't many other better options!

Personally I'd like a Kobayashi/Petrov lineup.

_________________
Official Kamui Kobayashi Fanboy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 1:40 pm
Posts: 6650
jase.2 wrote:
And I thought this thread was about Caterham drivers not PDR's attitude lol


So what about Caterham drivers?
(I mean, that's the thread)

PdR is in the OP. His attitude can be discussed in the given context (as one of the contributing reasons to not get that seat) just as for example, in the OP mentioned Petrov who had been dropped by the team earlier and hence probably not willing to go back. lol. No harm done in discussing it; still a lot of time till 16th of March...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 10:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:36 pm
Posts: 5247
Prema wrote:
Lotus49 wrote:
Lentulus wrote:
Do you criticise the guy that decides whether you get fired or not? No. That's just common sense.


If they were at fault for whatever I was speaking out about then yes, absolutely.


Yeah, and if any possible let it be done in public, preferably through FB or Tweeter or some journalist. :twisted:




As long as it's justified it's fair game for me, in either direction. They can write it on the moon if you want.

_________________
"Clark came through at the end of the first lap so far ahead that we in the pits were convinced that the rest of the field must have been wiped out in an accident."
-Eddie Dennis, describing the dominance of Jim Clark in the Lotus 49 at Spa 1967


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: pokerman and 34 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group